71% Hydrogen - 27.1% Helium - .97% Oxygen - .4% Carbon ~This is the general chemical make up of a typical star ~This blog is dedicated to Astronomy. For the time being, it will consist only of a current project that I am conducting at Eastern University. People come here to see the stars the way I do. Officially, this is "My Astronomy Binder" - Unofficially, this is my way of making University a little more palatable.
~ ENJOY

 

Collective Nouns of Les Amis de l’ABC

enjolraispawn:

Apparently this was something that needed to be done.  [All nouns except where noted are courtesy of K and myself]

Enjolras  —>  A fleet of Enjolrai

Combeferre  —>  A business of Combeferres

Courfeyrac  —>  A chlamydia of Courfeyracs [courtesy of playthatsadtrombone]

Bahorel  —>  A bellowing of Bahorels

Bossuet  —>  A clove of Bossuets

Feuilly  —>  A fan-fare of Feuillys

Grantaire  —>  A clusterfuck of Grantaires

Jehan  —>  A enjambment of Jehans

Joly  —>  An epidemic of Jolys

and if you’re feeling nice…

Marius  —>  A heartful of Marius (alternatively a swoon of Marius)

(Source: enjolrastopheles)

fyeahuniverse:

A colorful new collection of galaxies from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, mission reveal a spectacular menagerie of galaxies during its prolific 3-year mission that ended in Feb. 2011. The showcase, released in May 2011 by NASA, shows several galaxy types, from elegant grand design spirals to more patchy flocculent spirals, while others have roundish centers or stretched central bars.

fyeahuniverse:

A colorful new collection of galaxies from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, mission reveal a spectacular menagerie of galaxies during its prolific 3-year mission that ended in Feb. 2011. The showcase, released in May 2011 by NASA, shows several galaxy types, from elegant grand design spirals to more patchy flocculent spirals, while others have roundish centers or stretched central bars.

(Source: throughascientificlens)

PLEASE! Read this FIRST!

HELLO, Dr. Bradstreet and/or Steve!

Katie here! 

Welcome to my Astronomy Observation notebook. 

This is just a friendly note to advise you to read the “Welcome to 71%” page before you begin this blog. 

This page is located on the left hand side of this page directly beneath the “HOME” button. 

Thank you and enjoy!


[before]


Something in the file transfer made the first half of the pictures really light and the second half dark. I tried to work with it in Photoshop, but it wouldn’t cooperate. 
So here is my moon mosaic in typical mosaic fashion: not matching up very well. 

[before]

Something in the file transfer made the first half of the pictures really light and the second half dark. I tried to work with it in Photoshop, but it wouldn’t cooperate. 

So here is my moon mosaic in typical mosaic fashion: not matching up very well. 

M63, also known as the Sunflower Galaxy is a gorgeous spiral galaxy in Canes Venatici.  First discovered by Pierre Mechain, it was added to the Messier catalog on that same day, June 14, 1779. It stands 37,000kly away and it’s brightness is at 8.6. 

For this color shot, I took red, blue, green, and clear shots of the same object and condensed them so I had one of each. With not other editing that flats, I then layered them in Photoshop and started tinkering with the color. Unfortunately, it was a cloudy night for color shots, thus the color looks strange and blue. Perhaps not the most accurate representation, but certainly aesthetically pleasing to an extent. 

Messier object 104 is more commonly known as the Sombrero galaxy, and for good reason.  This hat-shaped spiral galaxy, found in Virgo, was discovered by Pierre Mechain in 1781, but not added to the official Messier catalogue until 1921. This galaxy has a big and bright nucleus and an extensive globular cluster system.  It is 8.0 in magnitude and 50,000kly from our galaxy. 

I found that the best way to see the brightness of the core of M104 was to increase the contrast almost all the way then add a magenta color filter to bring out the actual object. I used a single low-pass kernel before adding the color filter. 

M97, also known as the Owl Nebula, is a Planetary Nebula in Ursa Major. Discovered by Pierre Mechain in 1781, the Owl Nebula is one of 4 in Ursa Major. It’s distance from Earth is 2.6kly and it has a visual brightness of 9.9, much greater than seen with a camera. 

For these frames, I used 5 of 7 shots and combined them. For the second frame, I adjusted the contrast and brightness accordingly to pull out the “Owl’s Eyes.” I also used a magenta filter on this final edit. For the second frame, I used low-pass kernel filters and ramped up the contrast so that the stars in and around this nebula could be better seen. 


Uranus, the seventh planet from the Sun, was discovered in 1781 by William Herschel. 
It is named after the Greek god of the sky and, though visible to the naked eye, it was not recognized as a planet until 1781 because of it’s dimness. Uranus falls into the catagory “ice giants” because it’s composition contains more “ices” (water, ammonia, methane) than most others. The planet itself is composed of ices and rock and is covered by a thick layer of clouds made up of water and possibly methane. Uranus has 27 known natural satellites, all named after characters from the works of Shakespears, the five main players being Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Tatiana, and Oberon. 

Uranus, the seventh planet from the Sun, was discovered in 1781 by William Herschel. 

It is named after the Greek god of the sky and, though visible to the naked eye, it was not recognized as a planet until 1781 because of it’s dimness. Uranus falls into the catagory “ice giants” because it’s composition contains more “ices” (water, ammonia, methane) than most others. The planet itself is composed of ices and rock and is covered by a thick layer of clouds made up of water and possibly methane. Uranus has 27 known natural satellites, all named after characters from the works of Shakespears, the five main players being Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Tatiana, and Oberon. 


The planet Venus, sometimes known as the Morning or Evening star,  is the second planet from the sun and is named after the Roman goddess of love and beauty. After the moon, it is the brightest natural object in the night sky. It’s apparent magnitude is -4.6. This planet was  believed to once have oceans which have since evaporated; it is now dry and desert-like.   It’s surface is obscured by a thick layer of clouds. It’s composition is about 97% carbon dioxide, though it is similar to Earth in size and gravity. Venus currently has no moons, though it did at one point billions of years ago. 

The planet Venus, sometimes known as the Morning or Evening star,  is the second planet from the sun and is named after the Roman goddess of love and beauty. After the moon, it is the brightest natural object in the night sky. It’s apparent magnitude is -4.6. This planet was  believed to once have oceans which have since evaporated; it is now dry and desert-like.   It’s surface is obscured by a thick layer of clouds. It’s composition is about 97% carbon dioxide, though it is similar to Earth in size and gravity. Venus currently has no moons, though it did at one point billions of years ago. 

Saturn is the sixth planet from the sun, second largest in the solar system, and is named after the father of Jupiter in Roman mythology. Aside from Earth, it is the easiest planet to identify because of it’s prominent rings or bands. Saturn is one of the Jovian planets and it has many moons (62 known). Of those moons, 53 are named and of THOSE, Titan is the largest.  It is by far much larger than Mercury and is able to retain a substantial atmosphere.  

My Saturn shots were taken through a green filter with green flats to define the shape more than a clear. I toned the saturation and brightness down and ramped the contrast up enough that the rings could be distinguished from the planet itself. I used one hi-pass kernel for the finishing sharpness. 


Jupiter, named after the Roman king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder; the equivalent of the Greek Zeus, is the fifth planet from our Sun and the largest planet in our Solar System.  It is considered a gas giant made mostly of hydrogen and helium and is typically known as a “failed star,” though it is the third brightest object in the night sky. It has a famous irregularity, which seems to have appeared in 1664, known as the Great Red Spot.   This is essentially a cyclonic storm above the surface of the planet. Jupiter has at least 66 moons, 4 of which are much larger than the others. These moons, discovered by Galileo in 1610 are now known as the Galilean moons, the largest of which is larger than Mercury. 

Jupiter, named after the Roman king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder; the equivalent of the Greek Zeus, is the fifth planet from our Sun and the largest planet in our Solar System.  It is considered a gas giant made mostly of hydrogen and helium and is typically known as a “failed star,” though it is the third brightest object in the night sky. It has a famous irregularity, which seems to have appeared in 1664, known as the Great Red Spot.   This is essentially a cyclonic storm above the surface of the planet. Jupiter has at least 66 moons, 4 of which are much larger than the others. These moons, discovered by Galileo in 1610 are now known as the Galilean moons, the largest of which is larger than Mercury. 

Mars, the fourth planet from our Sun, is named after the Roman god of War, though it was recorded by Egyptian astronomers as early as 1534 years BCE. The iron oxide on its surface gives it a ruddy, reddish orange colouring.  In 1877, Asaph Hall discovered Mars’ two moons, Phobos and Deimos, which have a close orbit.  In the past few years, many NASA missions have probed Mars and have found interesting conditions which could possibly sustain life. Aside from Earth, Mars seems to be the most “known” of the planets in our solar system.  

Aside from a flat-field application, very little was done to get this photograph from frame one to frame two. The normal contrast/brightness adjustment was used in order to get rid of some background light and noise, but no filters. It is a planet, after all, there isn’t much one can do with a bright planet through the clouds.